A tear-jerker about love, family, and learning to trust yourself.

WITH YOU ALL THE WAY

Ada, a gifted teen artist, draws in order to help see the world around her.

But art won’t help her answer the questions she is struggling with the most: Does she love her boyfriend? Is she ready to have sex? How will she know, and who can she talk to about how she really feels? Ada feels stuck between pressure from her popular boyfriend, Leo, and warnings from her older and more experienced sister, Afton. To make matters worse, Ada senses growing tensions between her mother, a successful, and increasingly unavailable thoracic surgeon, and her stepfather, Pop, an emergency room nurse. When her mother whisks Ada and her two sisters off with her to a medical conference in Hawaii, leaving Pop behind, Ada begins to worry her family is falling apart. During the week away, Ada realizes that sex can change everything: your family, your relationships, and your sense of self. The novel centers a multiracial blended family—Ada, Afton, and their mom are White; Pop is Black; and the girls’ younger sister is biracial—with an ambitious, often absent mother and a father who acts as the central caretaker. These identities are named but not explored in the story. The emotionally well-developed central characters, smooth pacing, and frank and open discussions of sex, love, and relationships make this a satisfying read for teens and adults alike.

A tear-jerker about love, family, and learning to trust yourself. (Fiction. 13-18)

Pub Date: March 30, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-06-269319-8

Page Count: 336

Publisher: HarperTeen

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2021

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This grittily provocative debut explores the horrors of self-harm and the healing power of artistic expression.

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GIRL IN PIECES

After surviving a suicide attempt, a fragile teen isn't sure she can endure without cutting herself.

Seventeen-year-old Charlie Davis, a white girl living on the margins, thinks she has little reason to live: her father drowned himself; her bereft and abusive mother kicked her out; her best friend, Ellis, is nearly brain dead after cutting too deeply; and she's gone through unspeakable experiences living on the street. After spending time in treatment with other young women like her—who cut, burn, poke, and otherwise hurt themselves—Charlie is released and takes a bus from the Twin Cities to Tucson to be closer to Mikey, a boy she "like-likes" but who had pined for Ellis instead. But things don't go as planned in the Arizona desert, because sweet Mikey just wants to be friends. Feeling rejected, Charlie, an artist, is drawn into a destructive new relationship with her sexy older co-worker, a "semifamous" local musician who's obviously a junkie alcoholic. Through intense, diarylike chapters chronicling Charlie's journey, the author captures the brutal and heartbreaking way "girls who write their pain on their bodies" scar and mar themselves, either succumbing or surviving. Like most issue books, this is not an easy read, but it's poignant and transcendent as Charlie breaks more and more before piecing herself back together.

This grittily provocative debut explores the horrors of self-harm and the healing power of artistic expression. (author’s note) (Fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-101-93471-5

Page Count: 416

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2016

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A contemporary hero’s journey, brilliantly told.

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SOLO

The 17-year-old son of a troubled rock star is determined to find his own way in life and love.

On the verge of adulthood, Blade Morrison wants to leave his father’s bad-boy reputation for drug-and-alcohol–induced antics and his sister’s edgy lifestyle behind. The death of his mother 10 years ago left them all without an anchor. Named for the black superhero, Blade shares his family’s connection to music but resents the paparazzi that prevent him from having an open relationship with the girl that he loves. However, there is one secret even Blade is unaware of, and when his sister reveals the truth of his heritage during a bitter fight, Blade is stunned. When he finally gains some measure of equilibrium, he decides to investigate, embarking on a search that will lead him to a small, remote village in Ghana. Along the way, he meets people with a sense of purpose, especially Joy, a young Ghanaian who helps him despite her suspicions of Americans. This rich novel in verse is full of the music that forms its core. In addition to Alexander and co-author Hess’ skilled use of language, references to classic rock songs abound. Secondary characters add texture to the story: does his girlfriend have real feelings for Blade? Is there more to his father than his inability to stay clean and sober? At the center is Blade, fully realized and achingly real in his pain and confusion.

A contemporary hero’s journey, brilliantly told. (Verse fiction. 14-adult)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-310-76183-9

Page Count: 464

Publisher: Blink

Review Posted Online: May 1, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2017

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