SHE’LL BE COMING ’ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

Sing along, dance along and follow the adventures of rootin’ tootin’ frontier Babe. After a short introduction, the text swings into multiple verses of the title tune. Who knew there were so many? “She’ll dance across the rooftops” and “she’ll paint the whole town purple” are just two. Each verse also has its own fun exclamation for listeners to shout out or sing, from “Toot-Toot!” to “Tee-Hee!” to “Squish-Splat!” Backmatter even includes pictured instructions on how to perform each exclamation. (For “Squish-Splat,” you imagine juggling jelly with both hands.) Another surprise is a pair of giant saloon-door pages that open out to reveal Babe and all of her partying friends waiting to come in. Dancing type adds energy to Emmett’s Wild West hokey pokey, as do Allwright’s lively illustrations full of dancing, jiggling chickens, prairie dogs, owls and, of course, kids. Yee-Ha! (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: April 10, 2007

ISBN: 1-4169-3652-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2007

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An early reader that kids will want to befriend.

NOT ME!

In an odd-couple pairing of Bear and Chipmunk, only one friend is truly happy to spend the day at the beach.

“Not me!” is poor Chipmunk’s lament each time Bear expresses the pleasure he takes in sunning, swimming, and other activities at the beach. While controlled, repetitive text makes the story accessible to new readers, slapstick humor characterizes the busy watercolor-and-ink illustrations and adds interest. Poor Chipmunk is pinched by a crab, buried in sand, and swept upside down into the water, to name just a few mishaps. Although other animal beachgoers seem to notice Chipmunk’s distress, Bear cheerily goes about his day and seems blithely ignorant of his friend’s misfortunes. The playful tone of the illustrations helps soften the dynamic so that it doesn’t seem as though Chipmunk is in grave danger or that Bear is cruel. As they leave at the end of the book Bear finally asks, “Why did you come?” and Chipmunk’s sweet response caps off the day with a warm sunset in the background.

An early reader that kids will want to befriend. (Early reader. 5-7)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-8234-3546-3

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Dec. 8, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2015

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EQUAL SHMEQUAL

Forest animals learn the many meanings of “equal” through a game of tug-of-war. Mouse initiates the game with Bear, but then realizes that he forgot the important rule of equal teams. As more animals join in, they debate about how to divide evenly and test their ideas. Meat versus plant eaters doesn’t work, nor does furry versus not furry or even halves, since they are different sizes. Bear’s response to it all? “Equal Shmequal.” Gradually the animals learn that just because the numbers are equal does not mean the teams are equal. Mouse’s solution is to equalize the weights, using a seesaw to balance the teams. When Bear and Mouse pull against Turtle, Rabbit, Bobcat, Wolf and Deer, neither side moves—until Bear gets distracted. Moral: “What really matters is equal effort.” A final note tells readers “what it means to be equal” in math, art, law and team sports. Detailed watercolor illustrations clearly show readers what is equal and what is not, especially as the animals fail at their early efforts. A cute look at what can be a difficult concept. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: July 1, 2005

ISBN: 1-57091-891-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Charlesbridge

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2005

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