An upbeat, useful, and wide-ranging look at recovering from injuries—and preventing them.

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HOW TO RECOVER FROM INJURY AND THRIVE

A comprehensive guide focuses on physical injury and recovery.

Everyone gets hurt, Stone writes bluntly at the beginning of his book, and it’s possible to come back from an injury faster and fitter than ever. But to accomplish this, the injured “need information on how to do so, what can help them, and how they can motivate themselves,” he writes. “They need to recognize the recovery process as long, entwined with their habits and mindset, and affected by a large variety of factors.” For years, the author, a physician, has built a practice giving this help to everybody from professional athletes to older patients dealing with issues like arthritis. This manual is the distillation of all that he’s learned about both the physical and psychological dimensions of injuries. He thus mixes a lot of practical advice—about things like posture, nutrition, and exercise—with broader philosophical observations about the active lifestyle, urging his readers to attend to the little problems so as to head off the larger ones. Ignore those minor difficulties, he asserts, and issues will accumulate: “Pay attention, and you can live well until the day you die.” Stone’s writing displays a light, very engaging tone that’s partial to both attractive idealism and puckish humor (when advocating at least 30 minutes of sunlight exposure every day, for instance, he recommends skinny-dipping). And he wards off accusations that he’s enabling irresponsible thrill-seekers with neat bravado: “To live without any risk entirely is both impossible and foolish.” His counsel on everything from skiing to rock climbing is both informed and encouraging to readers of all ages. And the helpful tips are all delivered with a calm, confident optimism that will be uplifting, particularly to readers who think they may never bounce back from their latest injuries.

An upbeat, useful, and wide-ranging look at recovering from injuries—and preventing them.

Pub Date: Dec. 6, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-5445-2676-8

Page Count: 480

Publisher: Lioncrest Publishing

Review Posted Online: Jan. 17, 2022

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Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and...

THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS

A dense, absorbing investigation into the medical community's exploitation of a dying woman and her family's struggle to salvage truth and dignity decades later.

In a well-paced, vibrant narrative, Popular Science contributor and Culture Dish blogger Skloot (Creative Writing/Univ. of Memphis) demonstrates that for every human cell put under a microscope, a complex life story is inexorably attached, to which doctors, researchers and laboratories have often been woefully insensitive and unaccountable. In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, an African-American mother of five, was diagnosed with what proved to be a fatal form of cervical cancer. At Johns Hopkins, the doctors harvested cells from her cervix without her permission and distributed them to labs around the globe, where they were multiplied and used for a diverse array of treatments. Known as HeLa cells, they became one of the world's most ubiquitous sources for medical research of everything from hormones, steroids and vitamins to gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, even the polio vaccine—all without the knowledge, must less consent, of the Lacks family. Skloot spent a decade interviewing every relative of Lacks she could find, excavating difficult memories and long-simmering outrage that had lay dormant since their loved one's sorrowful demise. Equal parts intimate biography and brutal clinical reportage, Skloot's graceful narrative adeptly navigates the wrenching Lack family recollections and the sobering, overarching realities of poverty and pre–civil-rights racism. The author's style is matched by a methodical scientific rigor and manifest expertise in the field.

Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and Petri dish politics.

Pub Date: Feb. 9, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-4000-5217-2

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2010

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A refreshing celebrity memoir focused not strictly on the self but on a much larger horizon.

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WILL

One of Hollywood’s biggest stars delivers a memoir of success won through endless, relentless work and self-reckoning.

“My imagination is my gift, and when it merges with my work ethic, I can make money rain from the heavens.” So writes Smith, whose imagination is indeed a thing of wonder—a means of coping with fear, an abusive father with the heart of a drill instructor, and all manner of inner yearnings. The author’s imagination took him from a job bagging ice in Philadelphia to initial success as a partner in the Grammy-winning rap act DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince. Smith was propelled into stardom thanks to the ministrations of Quincy Jones, who arranged an audition in the middle of his own birthday party, bellowing “No paralysis through analysis!” when Smith begged for time to prepare. The mantra—which Jones intoned 50-odd times during the two hours it took for the Hollywood suits to draw up a contract for the hit comedy series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air—is telling, for hidden within this memoir lies a powerful self-help book. For Smith, all of life is a challenge in which one’s feelings are largely immaterial. “I watched my father’s negative emotions seize control of his ample intellect and cause him over and over again to destroy beautiful parts of our family,” he writes, good reason for him to sublimate negativity in the drive to get what he wanted—money, at first, and lots of it, which got him in trouble with the IRS in the early 1990s. Smith, having developed a self-image that cast him as a coward, opines that one’s best life is lived by facing up to the things that hold us back. “I’ve been making a conscious effort to attack all the things that I’m scared of,” he writes, adding, “And this is scary.” It’s a good lesson for any aspiring creative to ponder—though it helps to have Smith’s abundant talent, too.

A refreshing celebrity memoir focused not strictly on the self but on a much larger horizon.

Pub Date: Nov. 9, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-984877-92-5

Page Count: 432

Publisher: Penguin Press

Review Posted Online: Nov. 9, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2021

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