A dream for true big-rig fans.

WHOSE BIG RIG?

From the Guess the Job series

Meet specialized big rigs involved in building a light-rail system.

Caution! Here’s a board book designed for hard-core machine aficionados. Rhyming text inside striking goldenrod-colored traffic signs on the left-hand page introduces a building task. “Dig the channels so water can flow”; a second, orange sign queries, “Whose big rig is this?” The right-hand page diagrams the machine responsible for the job, with many of the relevant, often quite technical components clearly labeled. Some preschoolers will want to devour every “gripper arm” factoid, but it’s definitely optional reading. A fold-out flap offers more generally accessible information, naming and showing the team at work along with a succinct explanation. A “tunnel borer” team, for instance, will “cut through rock to make way for underground tracks.” Some big rigs, like the excavator and the bulldozer, will be old favorites, but there are many new, intriguing machines and workers to learn about, including the “tie dragon’s crew,” which lays the ties of the tracks, or the “track maintenance specialist,” who “make[s] tracks level.” Tidy illustrations provide readers with clear snapshots of the various machines, and workers are made up of racially and gender diverse crews. The final flap, showing small children playing with a toy train set who have “come to help,” is satisfying.

A dream for true big-rig fans. (Board book. 2-6)

Pub Date: May 25, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-4197-4220-0

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Abrams Appleseed

Review Posted Online: May 5, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2021

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Sure to appeal to budding paleontologists everywhere.

HELLO, DINOSAURS!

From the Animal Facts and Flaps series

Colorful, fun, and informative guide for pint-sized dinosaur enthusiasts.

Kid-friendly and more informative than most dino books for tots, this lift-the-flap dinosaur book is a great next step for any kid with an interest in the subject. Each double-page panorama—occasionally folding out to three or even four pages wide—is organized around types of dinosaurs or habitats. While most featured dinosaurs are land dwellers, prehistoric reptiles of the sea and sky appear as well. Dinosaurs are rendered in bright colors on a white background in a childlike style that makes even Tyrannosaurus rex not too terrifying. Make no mistake, though; the king of the dinosaurs is clearly labeled “CARNIVORE.” Folding T. rex’s head back reveals a black-and-white handsaw, to which the text likens its enormous, sharp teeth. Another marginal illustration, captioned, “Watch out! T. rex is looking for its lunch,” shows a Triceratops specimen on a plate. Yet another reads, “Crushed dinosaur bones have been found in T. rex poop!” Several racially diverse kids appear in each scene, like toddler scientists variously observing, inspecting, and riding on the dinosaurs depicted. In addition to teaching the difference between herbivores and carnivores, the book also conveys a sense of the scale of these prehistoric beasts: Diplodocus is two school buses long, a Triceratops adult is the size of an elephant, and a Velociraptor is the size of a turkey, for example.

Sure to appeal to budding paleontologists everywhere. (Board book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 17, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5362-0809-2

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Templar/Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Nov. 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2019

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So rocket science can be fun.

BABY LOVES SCIENTISTS

YOU CAN BE ANYTHING!

From the Baby Loves… series

What do you want to be when you grow up?

If they haven’t already thought about their futures (and they probably haven’t), toddlers and preschoolers might start planning after perusing this cheerful first guide to scientific careers. Plump-cheeked, wide-eyed tykes with various skin and hair colors introduce different professions, including zoologist, meteorologist, aerospace engineer, and environmental scientist, depicted with cues to tip readers off to what the jobs entail. The simple text presents the sometimes-long, tongue-twisting career names while helpfully defining them in comprehensible terms. For example, an environmental scientist “helps take care of our world,” and a zoologist is defined as someone who “studies how animals behave.” Scientists in general are identified as those who “study, learn, and solve problems.” Such basic language not only benefits youngsters, but also offers adults sharing the book easy vocabulary with which to expand on conversations with kids about the professions. The title’s ebullient appearance is helped along by the typography: The jobs’ names are set in all caps, printed in color and in a larger font than the surrounding text, and emphasized with exclamation points. Additionally, the buoyant watercolors feature clues to what scientists in these fields work with, such as celestial bodies for astronomers. The youngest listeners won’t necessarily get all of this, but the book works as a rudimentary introduction to STEM topics and a shoutout to scientific endeavors.

So rocket science can be fun. (Informational picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-62354-149-1

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Charlesbridge

Review Posted Online: Aug. 12, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2019

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