A celebration of female empowerment and empathy.

HUDDLE

HOW WOMEN UNLOCK THEIR COLLECTIVE POWER

How women find support by banding together.

Inspired by the Women’s March of 2017—“the largest single-day protest on American soil”—CNN news anchor Baldwin traveled around the country interviewing women who have found “comfort, strategy, and stamina” from close camaraderie: what the author calls a huddle. “A huddle,” she writes, “is a place where women can become energized by the mere fact of their coexistence.” As a journalist in a male-dominated industry, Baldwin reveals her personal experiences in finding support from female mentors, sponsors, and her own huddle of friends. Women, she discovered, are each other’s “most valuable asset.” Conversations with women—some famous, such as Ava DuVernay, Stacey Abrams, and Gloria Steinem, and many others lesser-known—have convinced Baldwin that a “new, intersectional women’s movement” is thriving. In Houston, for example, she discovered the Black Girl Magic judge huddle, a group comprised of Black women supporting one another in their efforts to attain judgeships: In 2018, an unprecedented 19 were elected. Some of the huddles have had national impact: the #MeToo movement, for one, and Time’s Up, an initiative to raise money and public awareness for combatting sexual assault, harassment, and inequality in the entertainment and other industries. Other huddles emerge from various needs: Girls on the Run, a female-led nonprofit to support runners; Kode with Klossy, a coding camp for teenage girls; Hello Sunshine Filmmaker Lab for Girls, Reese Witherspoon’s project for empowering young aspiring filmmakers; GirlTrek, “America’s largest health movement for Black women”; and “the Badasses,” a text chain among newly elected Congresswomen. Besides huddles, Baldwin celebrates women who dedicate themselves to amplifying women’s stories and lifting up others. “When multiple women command respect,” Baldwin writes, “they provide a foundation for all women to demand respect.” Though the author uncovers little groundbreaking news, the stories are encouraging and often inspiring.

A celebration of female empowerment and empathy.

Pub Date: April 6, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-06-301744-3

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Harper Business

Review Posted Online: Jan. 30, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2021

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A top-notch political memoir and serious exercise in practical politics for every reader.

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A PROMISED LAND

In the first volume of his presidential memoir, Obama recounts the hard path to the White House.

In this long, often surprisingly candid narrative, Obama depicts a callow youth spent playing basketball and “getting loaded,” his early reading of difficult authors serving as a way to impress coed classmates. (“As a strategy for picking up girls, my pseudo-intellectualism proved mostly worthless,” he admits.) Yet seriousness did come to him in time and, with it, the conviction that America could live up to its stated aspirations. His early political role as an Illinois state senator, itself an unlikely victory, was not big enough to contain Obama’s early ambition, nor was his term as U.S. Senator. Only the presidency would do, a path he painstakingly carved out, vote by vote and speech by careful speech. As he writes, “By nature I’m a deliberate speaker, which, by the standards of presidential candidates, helped keep my gaffe quotient relatively low.” The author speaks freely about the many obstacles of the race—not just the question of race and racism itself, but also the rise, with “potent disruptor” Sarah Palin, of a know-nothingism that would manifest itself in an obdurate, ideologically driven Republican legislature. Not to mention the meddlings of Donald Trump, who turns up in this volume for his idiotic “birther” campaign while simultaneously fishing for a contract to build “a beautiful ballroom” on the White House lawn. A born moderate, Obama allows that he might not have been ideological enough in the face of Mitch McConnell, whose primary concern was then “clawing [his] way back to power.” Indeed, one of the most compelling aspects of the book, as smoothly written as his previous books, is Obama’s cleareyed scene-setting for how the political landscape would become so fractured—surely a topic he’ll expand on in the next volume.

A top-notch political memoir and serious exercise in practical politics for every reader.

Pub Date: Nov. 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5247-6316-9

Page Count: 768

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Nov. 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2020

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Not an easy read but an essential one.

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HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST

Title notwithstanding, this latest from the National Book Award–winning author is no guidebook to getting woke.

In fact, the word “woke” appears nowhere within its pages. Rather, it is a combination memoir and extension of Atlantic columnist Kendi’s towering Stamped From the Beginning (2016) that leads readers through a taxonomy of racist thought to anti-racist action. Never wavering from the thesis introduced in his previous book, that “racism is a powerful collection of racist policies that lead to racial inequity and are substantiated by racist ideas,” the author posits a seemingly simple binary: “Antiracism is a powerful collection of antiracist policies that lead to racial equity and are substantiated by antiracist ideas.” The author, founding director of American University’s Antiracist Research and Policy Center, chronicles how he grew from a childhood steeped in black liberation Christianity to his doctoral studies, identifying and dispelling the layers of racist thought under which he had operated. “Internalized racism,” he writes, “is the real Black on Black Crime.” Kendi methodically examines racism through numerous lenses: power, biology, ethnicity, body, culture, and so forth, all the way to the intersectional constructs of gender racism and queer racism (the only section of the book that feels rushed). Each chapter examines one facet of racism, the authorial camera alternately zooming in on an episode from Kendi’s life that exemplifies it—e.g., as a teen, he wore light-colored contact lenses, wanting “to be Black but…not…to look Black”—and then panning to the history that informs it (the antebellum hierarchy that valued light skin over dark). The author then reframes those received ideas with inexorable logic: “Either racist policy or Black inferiority explains why White people are wealthier, healthier, and more powerful than Black people today.” If Kendi is justifiably hard on America, he’s just as hard on himself. When he began college, “anti-Black racist ideas covered my freshman eyes like my orange contacts.” This unsparing honesty helps readers, both white and people of color, navigate this difficult intellectual territory.

Not an easy read but an essential one.

Pub Date: Aug. 13, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-525-50928-8

Page Count: 320

Publisher: One World/Random House

Review Posted Online: April 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2019

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