Nichols is sure to inspire an entire generation of new “artivists.”

ART OF PROTEST

CREATING, DISCOVERING, AND ACTIVATING ART FOR YOUR REVOLUTION

“This book will encourage and equip [readers] to use art as a language and instrument that can help…champion [their] chosen cause.”

Beginning on a personal note, Nichols breaks down her involvement in the Black Lives Matter movement in Missouri, starting in 2014, and uses this jumping-off point to widen the scope to thoughtfully balance personal accounts of protest with a wider global perspective. In straightforward, accessible language she takes readers through the history of visual media for social change through the past and into the modern day, ending with speculation on where current trends will take protest art in the future. Appropriately packing the text with graphics from several artists displaying unique visual styles, author and artist Nichols prepares the next generation of young art activists with a comprehensive guide to the inextricable relationship between protest and art. Inspiring, pop-color illustrations highlight five youth climate activists around the world. Featuring examples of work and quotes from the likes of Ai Weiwei, Nina Simone, Diego Rivera, and Keith Haring, Nichols arms young readers with basic introductions in reading visual information—including color associations, common symbology, typography, and popular formats such as zine making, screen printing, and—escaping the two-dimensional—various protest demonstrations. Abundant contextual information pairs beautifully with encouragement to engage—safely—with protest in a variety of ways suited to civic-minded young artists.

Nichols is sure to inspire an entire generation of new “artivists.” (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Nov. 30, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-5362-2325-5

Page Count: 80

Publisher: Big Picture/Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2021

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Essential.

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THIS BOOK IS ANTI-RACIST

20 LESSONS ON HOW TO WAKE UP, TAKE ACTION, AND DO THE WORK

A guidebook for taking action against racism.

The clear title and bold, colorful illustrations will immediately draw attention to this book, designed to guide each reader on a personal journey to work to dismantle racism. In the author’s note, Jewell begins with explanations about word choice, including the use of the terms “folx,” because it is gender neutral, and “global majority,” noting that marginalized communities of color are actually the majority in the world. She also chooses to capitalize Black, Brown, and Indigenous as a way of centering these communities’ voices; "white" is not capitalized. Organized in four sections—identity, history, taking action, and working in solidarity—each chapter builds on the lessons of the previous section. Underlined words are defined in the glossary, but Jewell unpacks concepts around race in an accessible way, bringing attention to common misunderstandings. Activities are included at the end of each chapter; they are effective, prompting both self-reflection and action steps from readers. The activities are designed to not be written inside the actual book; instead Jewell invites readers to find a special notebook and favorite pen and use that throughout. Combining the disruption of common fallacies, spotlights on change makers, the author’s personal reflections, and a call to action, this powerful book has something for all young people no matter what stage they are at in terms of awareness or activism.

Essential. (author’s note, further reading, glossary, select bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7112-4521-1

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2019

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A likable journey that is sensitive to the triumphs and agonies of being a 13-year-old girl.

FRIENDS FOREVER

From the Friends series , Vol. 3

Shannon just wants to get through eighth grade in one piece—while feeling like her own worst enemy.

In this third entry in popular author for young people Hale’s graphic memoir series, the young, sensitive overachiever is crushed by expectations: to be cool but loyal to her tightknit and dramatic friend group, a top student but not a nerd, attractive to boys but true to her ideals. As events in Shannon’s life begin to overwhelm her, she works toward finding a way to love and understand herself, follow her passions for theater and writing, and ignore her cruel inner voice. Capturing the visceral embarrassments of middle school in 1987 Salt Lake City, Shannon’s emotions are vivid and often excruciating. In particular, the social norms of a church-oriented family are clearly addressed, and religion is shown as being both a comfort and a struggle for Shannon. While the text is sometimes in danger of spelling things out a little too neatly and obviously, the emotional honesty and sincerity drawn from Hale’s own life win out. Pham’s artwork is vibrant and appealing, with stylistic changes for Shannon’s imaginings and the leeching out of color and use of creative panel structures as her anxiety and depression worsen.

A likable journey that is sensitive to the triumphs and agonies of being a 13-year-old girl. (author's note, gallery) (Graphic memoir. 10-14)

Pub Date: Aug. 31, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-31755-1

Page Count: 320

Publisher: First Second

Review Posted Online: June 11, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2021

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