THE DEMONS’ MISTAKE

A STORY FROM CHELM

No one has ever claimed that demons were clever. And demons from Chelm, that legendary town of fools, are as foolish as foolish can be. Of course, to illustrate this, the foolishness of the people must first be demonstrated. First one trick then another is played on the townspeople. But it seems demons are as gullible as people are. So when they hear that in America the streets are paved with gold, nothing will do but that they must depart immediately. Although they can fly, it’s awfully far, and “what will prevent us from flying off the edge of the earth?” Of all the demons, only Zereda thinks ships are too slow. She will fly to America. All of the others climb into a crate that will be shipped. What a voyage they have, trapped inside a crate that’s nailed shut! They learn one thing—demons can get seasick! And when they get to America, they learn that crates need an address or they will never be delivered. Fifty years pass before they’re finally let out! Coping with modern-day America, the demons must make some serious adjustments. Here their old tricks go unnoticed or are simple annoyances of life. Zereda has been working on this, however, and is quick to show them what to do in this modern world. Now we know who’s really responsible for all the gossip in the newspapers, the traffic tie-ups, and the glitches in computers. Podwal and Prose have worked together before: The Angel’s Mistake (1997), etc. As usual, Podwal’s quirky illustrations are perfectly suited to Prose’s subtle humor, capturing the essence rather than the specifics of details. Perfectly silly. (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: Aug. 31, 2000

ISBN: 0-688-17565-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2000

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The theme of friendship and loyalty endures in this enjoyable mock-horror tale for new readers.

FLY GUY AND THE FRANKENFLY

From the Fly Guy series , Vol. 13

“It was a dark and stormy night” as series fans find Fly Guy and Buzz hard at work in their 13th adventure.

Buzz and his insect buddy are playing. After an evening of making puzzles, trying on creepy costumes and admiring a drawing Buzz created featuring them both in their frighteningly fun garb, Buzz’s eyes get heavy and he climbs into bed. But Fly Guy is up to something—he is “BIZZY!” Buzz drops off into dreamland…or does he? A couple of page turns reveal Fly Guy on the verge of bringing a gigantic monster to life. A flip of an electrical switch sets the nightmare in motion. “Buzz cried, ‘It’s Frankenfly!’ ” The enormous, green creature responds to Buzz’s shout and shambles over to him. No surprise that Fly Guy comes to Buzz’s rescue just as the monster, more silly than menacing, picks him up. Morning comes with a fall out of bed to reveal the result of the project Fly Guy was determined to finish the previous night. Giggles and grape juice bring this latest installment to a satisfying close. All the while, Arnold’s deftly drawn cartoon expressions comically show the range of emotions as Buzz and Fly Guy experience fear, shock, bewilderment, determination and pride.

The theme of friendship and loyalty endures in this enjoyable mock-horror tale for new readers. (Easy reader. 5-7)

Pub Date: July 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-545-49328-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: July 17, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2013

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MERRY CHRISTMAS, GERALDINE

A shaggy-dog tale about the journey of the biggest Christmas tree on the lot to Geraldine's home. Brother Willie helps, but the evergreen still needs to be trimmed down considerably during their arduous trip, as friendly shopkeepers shorten the trunk and prune out the top to make the tree more portable. It's still too large for the living room; the top is bent over by the ceiling—a silly touch, but at least Geraldine can place the star on it without help. In guileless illustrations and text, Keller (Geraldine First, 1996, etc.) accurately targets toddlers' tastes, but among holiday tales, this one is more heart than plot, and may be overshadowed by flashier Santas, Grinches, and reindeers with red noses. (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1997

ISBN: 0-688-14500-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1997

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