A sparkling addition to the new-sibling bookshelf.

PEPPER & POE

Life is good for Pepper, the household’s only cat, until Poe arrives—now nothing will be the same, as the new siblings navigate toys, space, and ultimately, friendship.

Pepper loves the days of the week. Sundays are for napping, Mondays for playing, Tuesdays for testing the dog’s patience. But this Wednesday, everything changes. A frisky, white kitten joins the family, and Pepper declares, “I don’t like it.” Poe is cute and jolly, and more than anything, the kitten wants to play with territorial Pepper. Seeking space and privacy, the elder feline runs, while the younger takes chase. Mayhem ensues, as dishes, laundry, boxes, and even Poe rain down. However, when the owner asks who’s at fault for the mess, the two blame the dog and are forever bonded. Digital illustrations capture the warmth and texture of hand-painted collage. Like Leo Lionni, the artist uses negative space to bring her expressive and appealing characters into focus—their emotions, desires, and intentions. Preston-Gannon perfectly depicts a young sibling relationship, with respect, wit, and empathy for both sides. True to her subjects, the ending is as hilarious as it is heartwarming, and it will leave readers clamoring for more.

A sparkling addition to the new-sibling bookshelf. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: July 28, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-545-68357-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Orchard/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: April 15, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2015

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Willems’ formula is still a winner.

THE PIGEON NEEDS A BATH!

From the Pigeon series

The pigeon is back, and he is filthy!

Readers haven’t seen the pigeon for a couple of years, not since The Duckling Gets a Cookie!? (2012), and apparently he hasn’t bathed in all that time. Per the usual routine, the bus driver (clad in shower cap and bathrobe) opens the story by asking readers to help convince the pigeon to take a bath. Though he’s covered in grime, the obstreperous bird predictably resists. He glares at readers and suggests that maybe they need baths. With the turn of the page, Willems anticipates readers’ energetic denials: The pigeon demands, “YEAH! When was the last time YOU had a bath?!” Another beat allows children to supply the answer. “Oh.” A trio of flies that find him repulsive (“P.U.!”) convinces him it’s time. One spread with 29 separate panels depicts the pigeon adjusting the bath (“Too wet!…Too cold.…Too reflective”) before the page turn reveals him jumping in with a spread-filling “SPLASH!” Readers accustomed to the pigeon formula will note that here the story breaks from its normal rhythms; instead of throwing a tantrum, the pigeon discovers what readers already know: “This is FUN!” All the elements are in place, including page backgrounds that modulate from dirty browns to fresh, clean colors and endpapers that bookend the story (including a very funny turnabout for the duckling, here a rubber bath toy).

Willems’ formula is still a winner. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: April 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4231-9087-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2014

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A visually striking, engaging picture book that sends the message that everyone counts.

ONE FAMILY

A playful counting book also acts as a celebration of family and human diversity.

Shannon’s text is delivered in spare, rhythmic, lilting verse that begins with one and counts up to 10 as it presents different groupings of things and people in individual families, always emphasizing the unitary nature of each combination. “One is six. One line of laundry. One butterfly’s legs. One family.” Gomez’s richly colored pictures clarify and expand on all that the text lists: For “six,” a picture showing six members of a multigenerational family of color includes a line of laundry with six items hanging from it outside of their windows, as well as the painting of a six-legged butterfly that a child in the family is creating. While text never directs the art to depict diverse individuals and family constellations, Gomez does just this in her illustrations. Interracial families are included, as are depictions of men with their arms around each other, and a Sikh man wearing a turban. This inclusive spirit supports the text’s culminating assertion that “One is one and everyone. One earth. One world. One family.”

A visually striking, engaging picture book that sends the message that everyone counts. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: May 26, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-374-30003-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Frances Foster/Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Review Posted Online: Feb. 3, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2015

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