Just the ticket for readers who are dying to introduce fart jokes into their Christmas festivities

RUDY'S WINDY CHRISTMAS

This British import focuses on Santa’s lead reindeer, Rudy, who, as the title indicates, has a major attack of flatulence on Christmas Eve.

When Mrs. Claus serves Brussels sprouts for dinner, she eats her own portion, but Santa Claus surreptitiously feeds his sprouts to Rudy (pictured here without a glowing red nose). During the Christmas Eve flight to deliver presents, Rudy continuously passes gas in every country, leaving the other reindeer weak from laughter. To get everyone back home, Rudy puts forth extra effort with green “super-turbo gas” that propels the sleigh back to the North Pole. The story revolves around Rudy passing gas and then apologizing for it, with lots of seminaughty jokes and crude euphemisms. Kids in the U.S. may not get the references to “wind” for flatulence or immediately comprehend the premise of sprouts and their unfortunate digestive effects. But once Rudy’s problem emerges, kids will learn all sorts of new terms for passing gas, like “sprouty whiff,” “windy pop,” “booty burp,” “stinky fluff,” as well as aurally inflected euphemisms such as “bottom flute” or “rear-end trumpet.” Amusing, large-format illustrations in a cool palette of blues and purples follow Rudy on his journey around the world, with his gassy output highlighted in lime green.

Just the ticket for readers who are dying to introduce fart jokes into their Christmas festivities . (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-8075-7173-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: Aug. 12, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2015

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Sweet, reassuring fun—and a story to fully embrace.

SLUG IN LOVE

A slug longs for a hug and finds it unexpectedly.

Doug the slug would really like a hug and plods on, seeking affection. But a caterpillar, bug, spider, and worm want no part of hugging a slug. They are just not feeling it (might they feel sluggish?), voicing their disdain in no uncertain terms with expressions like, “Grimy, slippy!” and “Squelchy, slimy!” What’s a slug to do? Undeterred, Doug keeps trying. He meets Gail, a snail with crimson lipstick and hip, red glasses; she happens to be as grimy and squelchy as he is, so he figures she is the hugger of his dreams. The two embark upon a madcap romantic courtship. Alas, Gail also draws the (slimy) line at hugging Doug. Finally, mournful Doug meets the best hugger and the true love of his life, proving there’s someone for everyone. This charmer will have readers rooting for Doug (and perhaps even wanting to hug him). Expressed in simple, jaunty verses that read and scan smoothly, the brief tale revolves around words that mainly rhyme with Doug and slug. Given that the story stretches vocabulary so well with regard to rhyming words, children can be challenged after a read-aloud session to offer up words that rhyme with slug and snail. The colorful and humorous illustrations are lively and cheerful; googly-eyed Doug is, like the other characters, entertaining and expressive. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

Sweet, reassuring fun—and a story to fully embrace. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Dec. 14, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-66590-046-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Paula Wiseman/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Just the thing for anyone with a Grinch-y tree of their own in the yard.

THE HALLOWEEN TREE

A grouchy sapling on a Christmas tree farm finds that there are better things than lights and decorations for its branches.

A Grinch among the other trees on the farm is determined never to become a sappy Christmas tree—and never to leave its spot. Its determination makes it so: It grows gnarled and twisted and needle-less. As time passes, the farm is swallowed by the suburbs. The neighborhood kids dare one another to climb the scary, grumpy-looking tree, and soon, they are using its branches for their imaginative play, the tree serving as a pirate ship, a fort, a spaceship, and a dragon. But in winter, the tree stands alone and feels bereft and lonely for the first time ever, and it can’t look away from the decorated tree inside the house next to its lot. When some parents threaten to cut the “horrible” tree down, the tree thinks, “Not now that my limbs are full of happy children,” showing how far it has come. Happily for the tree, the children won’t give up so easily, and though the tree never wished to become a Christmas tree, it’s perfectly content being a “trick or tree.” Martinez’s digital illustrations play up the humorous dichotomy between the happy, aspiring Christmas trees (and their shoppers) and the grumpy tree, and the diverse humans are satisfyingly expressive.

Just the thing for anyone with a Grinch-y tree of their own in the yard. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 6, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-4926-7335-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more