Inspiring, of course…but also a well-told tale, rich alike in intimate moments and momentous historical events.

GANDHI

MY LIFE IS MY MESSAGE

From the Campfire Heroes series

A fictionalized graphic “memoir” conveys bright pictures of the Great Soul’s character and achievements without falling into blind hero worship.

Quinn’s account is written in the first person and includes invented thoughts and dialogue that sometimes have an anachronistic ring. These literary gestures notwithstanding, the author retraces Gandhi’s career accurately and in relatively fine detail from childhood to assassination. More importantly, he also depicts the origins, logic and applications of Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolent disobedience (satyagraha) in deft, compelling strokes. There is a slight drift toward hagiography in later pages, capped by a reference to Gandhi’s “martyrdom,” but this is balanced by a cleareyed view of his actions as a younger man. He justifies his frequent abandonment of his family with a glib, less-than-saintly “Why should I rob my children of their right to self reliance?” His intelligent wife, Kasturba, will elicit particular sympathy, though she does get in her digs: “Oh yes, go, go, leave us again. We’re used to it.” Along with placing the large blocks of dialogue and narrative so that they’re seldom in the way, Nagar expertly positions panels and figures to create a visual sweep even in relatively static compositions. Action in the art is easy to follow, and scenes of violence are explicit but not disturbingly so.

Inspiring, of course…but also a well-told tale, rich alike in intimate moments and momentous historical events. (quotes, chronology, lists of books, films, websites) (Graphic novel. 11-15)

Pub Date: March 4, 2014

ISBN: 978-93-80741-22-2

Page Count: 212

Publisher: Campfire

Review Posted Online: Dec. 18, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2014

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A powerful tale of courage and principle igniting sweeping social change, told by a strong-minded, uniquely qualified...

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MARCH

BOOK ONE

From the March series , Vol. 1

Eisner winner Powell’s dramatic black-and-white graphic art ratchets up the intensity in this autobiographical opener by a major figure in the civil rights movement.

In this first of a projected trilogy, Lewis, one of the original Freedom Riders and currently in his 13th term as a U.S. Representative, recalls his early years—from raising (and preaching to) chickens on an Alabama farm to meeting Martin Luther King Jr. and joining lunch-counter sit-ins in Nashville in 1960. The account flashes back and forth between a conversation with two young visitors in Lewis’ congressional office just prior to Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration and events five or more decades ago. His education in nonviolence forms the central theme, and both in his frank, self-effacing accounts of rising tides of protest being met with increasingly violent responses and in Powell’s dark, cinematically angled and sequenced panels, the heroism of those who sat and marched and bore the abuse comes through with vivid, inspiring clarity. The volume closes with the founding of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (which Lewis went on to chair), and its publication is scheduled to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, at which Lewis preceded Dr. King on the podium: “Of everyone who spoke at the march, I’m the only one who’s still around.”

A powerful tale of courage and principle igniting sweeping social change, told by a strong-minded, uniquely qualified eyewitness. (Graphic memoir. 11-15)

Pub Date: Aug. 13, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-60309-300-2

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Top Shelf Productions

Review Posted Online: June 26, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2013

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“Why did she want to help? Why could she not turn a blind eye to those in need?” A searching and reverent treatment.

MOTHER TERESA

ANGEL OF THE SLUMS

From the Campfire Heroes series

Mother Teresa shines brightly both figuratively and literally in this graphic portrait of her life and mission.

Mother Teresa glows in a spotless white sari against jumbles of dim, run-down streets and impressionistically rendered inhabitants. Her slight, erect image anchors both the stately art and Helfand’s solemn account of her devotion to helping others, from childhood on. Mixing commentary with (invented but characteristic) dialogue, the author chronicles her compassionate works and, occasionally, captures just a hint of her strong personality too: “How much medicine do you need to purchase today, Mother Teresa?” a pharmacist asks. “Purchase? I thought you might want to do something beautiful for God.” Closing with her continuing progress toward formal sainthood and a spread of additional anecdotes, this account will leave readers deeply affected and perhaps even inspired by her profound devotion to the poor, ill and needy in India and the world.

“Why did she want to help? Why could she not turn a blind eye to those in need?” A searching and reverent treatment. (bibliography, foldout poster) (Graphic biography. 11-14)

Pub Date: June 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-93-80028-70-5

Page Count: 88

Publisher: Campfire

Review Posted Online: April 10, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2013

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