ALL ABOUT SHARKS

Arnosky turns his usual artistry and care to a subject sure to find a ready audience. Opening with a series of questions about sharks, he proceeds to answer them with a clear text and vivid, well-scaled illustrations (the gaping mouth of a 10-foot tiger shark appears life-size, split over two double-page spreads). Basic information, such as the different sorts of shark, how sharks sense their prey, and the ever-fascinating duplicate rows of teeth, is presented lucidly. Expatiating and defining text can be found located next to the appropriate parts of the illustrations, as with an extra tidbit about shark skin that appears with a magnified detail of it. It would be an altogether respectful and refreshingly unsensational presentation except for the information that deals with shark attacks. Explaining that sharks can swim extraordinarily close to shore, the text marvels that “shark attacks on people are extremely rare”—without indicating exactly how rare. In a later discussion of shark food, people are listed along with baby whales and swimming dogs—once again, with no accompanying mention of how unlikely one is to become shark supper. Regrettable. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)

Pub Date: July 1, 2003

ISBN: 0-590-48166-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2003

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A DOG NAMED SAM

A book that will make young dog-owners smile in recognition and confirm dogless readers' worst suspicions about the mayhem caused by pets, even winsome ones. Sam, who bears passing resemblance to an affable golden retriever, is praised for fetching the family newspaper, and goes on to fetch every other newspaper on the block. In the next story, only the children love Sam's swimming; he is yelled at by lifeguards and fishermen alike when he splashes through every watering hole he can find. Finally, there is woe to the entire family when Sam is bored and lonely for one long night. Boland has an essential message, captured in both both story and illustrations of this Easy-to-Read: Kids and dogs belong together, especially when it's a fun-loving canine like Sam. An appealing tale. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-8037-1530-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1996

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A quiet story of sharing with no strings attached.

EXTRA YARN

A little girl in a town of white snow and soot-blackened chimneys opens a small box and discovers a never-ending gift of colorful yarn.

Annabelle knits herself a sweater, and with the leftover yarn, she knits one for her dog, and with the yarn left over from that, she knits one for a neighbor and for her classmates and for her teacher and for her family and for the birdhouse and for the buildings in town. All and everything are warm, cozy and colorful until a clotheshorse of an archduke arrives. Annabelle refuses his monetary offers, whereupon the box is stolen. The greedy archduke gets his just deserts when he opens the box to find it empty. It wends its way back to Annabelle, who ends up happily sitting in a knit-covered tree. Klassen, who worked on the film Coraline, uses inks, gouache and colorized scans of a sweater to create a stylized, linear design of dark geometric shapes against a white background. The stitches of the sweaters add a subdued rainbow. Barnett entertained middle-grade readers with his Brixton Brothers detective series. Here, he maintains a folkloric narrative that results in a traditional story arc complete with repetition, drama and a satisfying conclusion.

A quiet story of sharing with no strings attached. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Jan. 17, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-06-195338-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Oct. 5, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2011

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