ONE WHOLE DAY

WILD PONIES

The wild ponies of Assateague Island capture the imagination of nature artist Arnosky (Turtle in the Sea, p. 948, etc.), who describes these beautiful creatures from sunrise to sunset using handsome double-paged acrylic paintings and a nearly rhyming text. Though rhymes are sometimes near misses (sea and breeze) and verses are rather trite: “On Assateague Island / out in the sea, / a mare tends her foal / in the shade of a tree,” the overall effect of the peaceful text and the softly painted illustrations of multi-colored horses and foals “having some wild pony fun” will appeal to young listeners. It might even prove useful as a goodnight story. Arnosky continues to experiment with his art and to perfect his craft; he really is unmatched in his approach to sharing nature with young children. His love and appreciation of the natural world are very evident in this title; he just needs someone to help him with his words. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-7922-7121-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: National Geographic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2002

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IF YOU TAKE A MOUSE TO SCHOOL

That well-known mouse runs his little boy ragged—this time by accompanying him to school. After packing a lunchbox full of treats and a backpack full of supplies, they head for the classroom. Things seem to be running smoothly until the mouse decides to do a bit of exploring. After trying his hand at the blackboard, demonstrating some impressive spelling and mathematical skills, he decides to attempt a science experiment. After a quick cleanup, he uses his artistic skills to build a house from blocks, furnishing it with clay furniture. While enjoying his new home, he munches his lunch then decides that he needs books for his bookcase. After writing a book, shooting hoops, skateboarding, and playing a bit of soccer outside, mouse is hungry again. A quick search for the missing snack ends happily back at school, leaving mouse to nibble on a cookie and do a bit of reading. With this pair’s standard refrain, the lessons of cause and effect are not lost, even though the situations sometimes become outrageous. Still, no one will be able to resist Mouse’s exuberance for learning as he happily charges through his day. A giggle-fest is sure to accompany this little guy wherever he goes. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: July 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-06-028328-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2002

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Though it is light on specific information about how and why teeth are lost, most children will enjoy relating to Bear in...

BEAR'S LOOSE TOOTH

Wilson and Chapman continue this popular series that began with Bear Snores On (2002).

Bear has invited his friends for lunch, when “something wiggled, and it wobbled…something moved when he chewed! It was… / Bear’s / loose / tooth!” In full-bleed spreads with a palette dominated by blues and greens, Chapman ably portrays Bear’s concern over this dental dilemma as well as the genuine empathy and determination of his many animal friends when they try to help remove the tooth. On several pages Bear looks right at readers as he reacts to his predicament, bringing them immediately into the story. After Hare, Mouse, Wren, Owl, Badger and others all fail at prying it loose, Bear “used his tongue and…gave a little nudge” until it falls out. A fairy comes as Bear sleeps and leaves “blueberries where Bear’s tooth had been!” Wilson keeps young readers engaged with rhyming text that keeps the gentle action flowing.

Though it is light on specific information about how and why teeth are lost, most children will enjoy relating to Bear in his latest oh-so-cozy adventure. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-4169-5855-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: McElderry

Review Posted Online: July 5, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2011

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