P IS FOR PUMPKIN

GOD’S HARVEST ALPHABET

The traditional alphabet-book format combines with rhyming couplets that relate Christian concepts to aspects of the fall season. A simple sentence with the individual letter and related word appears in a large font across the bottom of each page, with the related rhyming text at the top, enabling the volume to be used with just the abecedarian text for toddlers or the complete text for older preschoolers or beginning readers. For example, on the “S is for scarecrow” page, the corresponding rhyme offers the concept that God watches over readers just as a scarecrow watches over the crops. Pang’s illustrations are done in an appealing primitive style in a warm palette of fall shades, with a thoughtful overall design that sets off the art in oval shapes against solid backgrounds of autumnal colors. The little girl shown on the jacket is sound asleep with her dog in a pumpkin patch, but the inside spreads are much more lively than the cover illustration indicates. (Picture book/religion. 2-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-310-71180-3

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Zonderkidz

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2008

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ROADWORK

Sutton’s latest is a truck-lover’s dream come true—repetition, rhyme and onomatopoeia form the text, while construction trucks vie for readers’ attention in the illustrations. The result is a wonderfully noisy look at how roads are built. From a line on a map and an empty field to the finished road complete with lights and signs, youngsters will be able to follow all the steps, learning all the vehicles that take part in the process (a final page introduces readers to each one). “Pack the ground. Pack the ground. / Roll one way, then back. / Make the roadbed good and hard. / Clang! Crunch! Crack!” Lovelock’s debut certainly makes an impression. His pigmented ink illustrations keep the focus on the machines and the individual parts they play in building the road. The level of detail matches the text’s intended audience—enough to satisfy, not so much as to overwhelm. Pave the way to this book’s shelf; perfect for read-alouds, it will be a hit whether shared with a group or one-on-one. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-7636-3912-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2008

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Ideal for any community where children count.

COUNTING ON COMMUNITY

A difficult concept is simply and strikingly illustrated for the very youngest members of any community, with a counting exercise to boot.

From the opening invitation, “Living in community, / it's a lot of FUN! / Lets count the ways. / Lets start with ONE,” Nagaro shows an urban community that is multicultural, supportive, and happy—exactly like the neighborhoods that many families choose to live and raise their children in. Text on every other page rhymes unobtrusively. Unlike the vocabulary found in A Is for Activist (2013), this book’s is entirely age-appropriate (though some parents might not agree that picketing is a way to show “that we care”). In A Is for Activist, a cat was hidden on each page; this time, finding the duck is the game. Counting is almost peripheral to the message. On the page with “Seven bikes and scooters and helmets to share,” identifying toys in an artistic heap is confusing. There is only one helmet for five toys, unless you count the second helmet worn by the girl riding a scooter—but then there are eight items, not seven. Seven helmets and seven toys would have been clearer. That quibble aside, Nagara's graphic design skills are evident, with deep colors, interesting angles, and strong lines, in a mix of digital collage and ink.

Ideal for any community where children count. (Board book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 15, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-60980-632-3

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Triangle Square Books for Young Readers

Review Posted Online: July 27, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2016

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