LET’S FIND IT!

MY FIRST NATURE GUIDE

Two dozen plants and animals are hidden in plain sight on each page of this nearly wordless picture book. Thumb-sized plants and animals are painted and labeled against a white background on the left-hand page, while they appear as part of a fully developed watercolor painting on the right-hand page. The author invites children to find the plants and animals in the paintings while following a dog and cat that are exploring nature inside and outside in the city and country, in a meadow, pond, forest, and at the beach. Both common and unusual plants and animals are included. City dwellers will notice the pigeon, starling, and squirrel, while in the woods they are shown a bear, deer, fox, and porcupine. Flowers include Queen Anne’s Lace, thistle, chicory, and pokeweed as well as jack-in-the-pulpit and trees like the white spruce. Some illustrations are more successful than others. The sparrow is recognizable, but the mouse is not, and the bats and children are awkwardly drawn. The author concludes with more information on plants and animals and identifies those that appear on each page, giving common names. An entertaining first-look for nature lovers. (Nonfiction. 3-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 2002

ISBN: 0-8234-1539-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2002

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A TREE IS NICE

A nursery school approach to a general concept. "A tree is nice"- Why? Because..."We can climb the tree...play pirate ship...pick the apples...build playhouses out of the leaves. A tree is nice to hang a swing in...Birds build nests in trees... Sticks come off trees...People have picnics there too"...etc. etc. One follows the give and take of a shared succession of reactions to what a tree- or trees- can mean. There is a kind of poetic simplicity that is innate in small children. Marc Simont has made the pictures, half in full color, and they too have a childlike directness (with an underlying sophistication that adults will recognize). Not a book for everyone -but those who like it will like it immensely. The format (6 x 11) makes it a difficult book for shelving, so put it in the "clean hands" section of flat books. Here's your first book for Arbor Day use- a good spring and summer item.

Pub Date: June 15, 1956

ISBN: 978-0-06-443147-7

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: July 17, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1956

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ANIMALS IN WINTER

Winter is coming, and the animals are preparing: Some birds, bats, and butterflies migrate; other animals hibernate. The squirrel and pika gather food and store it; mice, deer, rabbits, and the handsome red fox on the dust jacket forage and hunt all winter long. The concluding pages show ways to help animals during the season: leaving seeds, suet, and fruit for the birds; dried corn for the squirrels; and shrubs with berries for foragers. A surprising amount of information appears in the short sentences and brief text of this Let's-Read-and-Find-Out title. Most of the animals, appearing without their scientific names, are familiar, with the exception of the pika. The illustrations are unusually attractive, swept clean of extraneous detail, and using a limited palette to heighten the drama: One effective spread shows brown deer and white snow against a stormy green-black sky. An informative volume. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 30, 1997

ISBN: 0-06-027157-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1996

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