Lends itself nicely to follow a certain action rhyme about baking! (Picture book. 1-3)

TEN LITTLE FINGERS, TWO SMALL HANDS

A diverse cast of toddlers use their hands in all different ways to eat a snack.

“Ten little fingers, one hand…two. / Two small hands belong to you!” The toddlers spy a cake and want to gobble it all up. One little white tot with a mop of curly blonde hair eagerly points one finger to the treat. An East-Asian youngster (judging by haircut) taps two fingers on an empty plate, clearly indicating where this cake should go. “Three little fingers pinch a bite. / Four little fingers squish it tight.” Counting from one to 10, the toddlers finish their snack (spilling some milk in the process, of course), but after 10 fingers clap in celebration…it’s time for more! With one tiny finger in the air and an impish grin, a brown-skinned mite with two fuzzy black pigtails pleads one more piece. There’s plenty of opportunity for interaction and cuddles as Dempsey encourages readers to “Count each finger one by one” and then kiss them when they’re done. Multiethnic, round-headed, chubby-handed babies want more, more, more.

Lends itself nicely to follow a certain action rhyme about baking! (Picture book. 1-3)

Pub Date: July 5, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-4998-0229-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little Bee Books

Review Posted Online: April 13, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2016

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Perfect for Valentine’s Day, but the syrupy sweetness will cloy after the holiday.

THE ABCS OF LOVE

Animal parents declare their love for their offspring in alphabetical order.

Each page displays an enormous capital letter, one line of verse with the keyword capitalized, and a loving nonhuman parent gazing adoringly at their baby. “A is for Always. I always love you more. / B is for Butterfly kisses. It’s you that I adore.” While not named or labelled as such, the A is also for an alligator and its hatchling and B is for a butterfly and a butterfly child (not a caterpillar—biology is not the aim of this title) interacting in some way with the said letter. For E there are an elephant and a calf; U features a unicorn and foal; and X, keyed to the last letter of the animal’s name, corresponds to a fox and three pups. The final double-page spread shows all the featured creatures and their babies as the last line declares: “Baby, I love you from A to Z!” The verse is standard fare and appropriately sentimental. The art is cartoony-cute and populated by suitably loving critters on solid backgrounds. Hearts accent each scene, but the theme of the project is never in any doubt.

Perfect for Valentine’s Day, but the syrupy sweetness will cloy after the holiday. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-7282-2095-6

Page Count: 28

Publisher: Sourcebooks Wonderland

Review Posted Online: Jan. 27, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2021

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Specific visuals ground this sweet celebration of simple pleasures.

MY HEART FILLS WITH HAPPINESS

Black-haired, brown-skinned children describe many sources of happiness in this board book, dedicated by the author to “former Indian Residential School students.”

“My heart fills with happiness when… / I see the face of someone I love // I smell bannock baking in the oven / I sing.” Author Smith, who is Cree, Lakota, and Scottish-Canadian, infuses her simple text with the occasional detail that bespeaks her First Nations heritage even as she celebrates universal pleasures. In addition to the smell of bannock, the narrator delights in dancing, listening to stories, and drumming. Cree-Métis artist Flett introduces visual details that further underscore this heritage, as in the moccasins, shawl, and braids worn by the dancing child and the drum and drumsticks wielded by the adult and toddler who lovingly make music together. (The “I drum” spread is repeated immediately, possibly to emphasize its importance, a detail that may disorient readers expecting a different scene.) Although the narrative voice is consistent, the children depicted change, which readers will note by hairstyle, dress, and relative age. The bannock bakes in a modern kitchen, and most of the clothing is likewise Western, emphasizing that these Native Americans are contemporary children. There is nothing in the text that specifically identifies them by nation, however.

Specific visuals ground this sweet celebration of simple pleasures. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: March 1, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-4598-0957-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: June 22, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2016

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