Sure to occupy little fingers.

I CAN COUNT

Practice counting objects and animals with an embedded arch of 10 movable beads.

This board book encourages number recognition and counting practice, thanks in part to its unusual design, which includes a curved die-cut opening through both covers and all pages. Occupying that space is a plastic rod arching from point to point, where it’s attached to an extra-thick internal page; strung on that rod are the 10 bright beads. The rhyming text encourages readers to answer questions like, “How many colors does a traffic light show?” or provides a directive such as, “Count [the airplanes] as they fly so high.” The beaded arch is usable from every page. Belaboring the point, “Slide the beads to help you count!” is written above it on every double-page spread. The number of items to count is clearly displayed as a numeral at the left-hand corner of every page, which is helpful for caregivers helping make the connection between one-to-one correspondence and the total number. When readers get to 10, they’re encouraged to count back down, a nice touch and a bit of an age-appropriate challenge aided by the beads. The illustrations are sweet, full of big-eyed characters. The simple and clear nature of the design lends itself to counting, and the beads facilitate both the math skill and fine-motor practice. This is assuming, of course, that the beads truly assist with counting rather than distract from it—a distinct possibility.

Sure to occupy little fingers. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Oct. 26, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-68010-686-2

Page Count: 12

Publisher: Tiger Tales

Review Posted Online: July 27, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2021

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A playful introduction to the body parts.

I WANT AN APPLE

HOW MY BODY WORKS

An unnamed protagonist is hungry—and all they want is an apple.

But how will they get one? The answer, they realize, is clear: They’ll have to use all the different parts of their body to help them get to the apple. First, they use their brain to locate where the fruit might be in the house. Then, they use their legs and feet to wander around the house, looking for where the apple might be. Next, they beseech their heart to keep pumping blood through their body to keep them going, then use their nose to try and sniff out the mysterious apple’s whereabouts. They then deploy eyes, arms, and fingers to find and pick up the apple; their five senses—along with their teeth—enable the kid to enjoy the crunchy fruit. By the time they’ve eaten the apple, the child has used—and celebrated—some of the most important parts of their body. The book ends with the child appreciating and loving the body that allows them to do so much. The illustrations are whimsical and full of movement, the narrator a trademark Catrow kewpie, with brown skin, glasses, and straight, black hair in three pigtails. The storyline mostly consists of naming different body parts and their functions, making this book most appropriate for very young readers. However, the message about body positivity will resonate with all ages. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

A playful introduction to the body parts. (Picture book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Oct. 12, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-8234-4104-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Aug. 11, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2021

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More information than toddlers will sit still for; not enough for preschoolers who are outgrowing board books.

MY BODY

From the Hello World! series

An introduction to the body for the youngest readers.

It’s an endlessly fascinating topic, but here it is explained in wordy and needlessly exclamatory detail. On the opening spread three children play: One flies a kite, another plays hopscotch, and a third hangs upside down from a branch while the text explains that “your body can do so many things!” Basic facts about each body part are explained on subsequent spreads—more or less. A spread devoted to the belly button gives no hint to its original purpose. A busy park scene with all the characters and summary text that emphasizes the importance of “Lots of sleep, good food, and plenty of exercise” ends this compendium. McDonald’s attempts to be inclusive don’t quite succeed. A brown-skinned boy playing wheelchair basketball is used to explain arm joints, and there are several other children of color in the book. But on the page about hearing, the brown-skinned tot’s prominent ears and his placement in a tree make him look more like a monkey than a child—an unfortunate association. Many spreads include a question that relates to the topic but could also prove distracting. An additional fact on each spread set in a smaller font is clearly for older children or grown-ups, not toddlers.

More information than toddlers will sit still for; not enough for preschoolers who are outgrowing board books. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Feb. 13, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-6636-8

Page Count: 27

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: May 23, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2018

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