TEATIME WITH EMMA BUTTERSNAP

There are many manuals on tea and tea parties, but Tate steps out of the lacy tablecloth variety to serve up a tea party within a story, told by the plucky young Emma Buttersnap. The excuse is a visit to her Aunt Pru in England, the precept, to learn about the history and origins of tea and tea-drinking as well as to present crafts, recipes, and hints for making the perfect cuppa. Instructions for making invitations, creating menus, and choosing teapots are outlined in Emma’s conversational narration; Bronson shows her as a perky doll of a girl in her round-buttoned pink dress and rebellious braids. Predominant purples and pinks will appeal to the tea party set, as will the antics of casting tea overboard in imitation of the Boston Tea Party, or the sight of tea poured out from a pot atop Emma’s head into cups atop the heads of her cats. The book can be read Ö la carte, with individual sections on preparing finger sandwiches and setting the table, or full service, where children can cozy up to Emma’s story about her aunt’s birthday, complete with a tea party fit for a queen. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1998

ISBN: 0-8050-5476-6

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1998

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A sweet, soft conversation starter and a charming gift.

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BECAUSE I HAD A TEACHER

A paean to teachers and their surrogates everywhere.

This gentle ode to a teacher’s skill at inspiring, encouraging, and being a role model is spoken, presumably, from a child’s viewpoint. However, the voice could equally be that of an adult, because who can’t look back upon teachers or other early mentors who gave of themselves and offered their pupils so much? Indeed, some of the self-aware, self-assured expressions herein seem perhaps more realistic as uttered from one who’s already grown. Alternatively, readers won’t fail to note that this small book, illustrated with gentle soy-ink drawings and featuring an adult-child bear duo engaged in various sedentary and lively pursuits, could just as easily be about human parent- (or grandparent-) child pairs: some of the softly colored illustrations depict scenarios that are more likely to occur within a home and/or other family-oriented setting. Makes sense: aren’t parents and other close family members children’s first teachers? This duality suggests that the book might be best shared one-on-one between a nostalgic adult and a child who’s developed some self-confidence, having learned a thing or two from a parent, grandparent, older relative, or classroom instructor.

A sweet, soft conversation starter and a charming gift. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-943200-08-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Compendium

Review Posted Online: Dec. 14, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2017

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A DOG NAMED SAM

A book that will make young dog-owners smile in recognition and confirm dogless readers' worst suspicions about the mayhem caused by pets, even winsome ones. Sam, who bears passing resemblance to an affable golden retriever, is praised for fetching the family newspaper, and goes on to fetch every other newspaper on the block. In the next story, only the children love Sam's swimming; he is yelled at by lifeguards and fishermen alike when he splashes through every watering hole he can find. Finally, there is woe to the entire family when Sam is bored and lonely for one long night. Boland has an essential message, captured in both both story and illustrations of this Easy-to-Read: Kids and dogs belong together, especially when it's a fun-loving canine like Sam. An appealing tale. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-8037-1530-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1996

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