Happy to see such a well-done feelings book.

I'M SAD

From the I'm Books series

Bibliotherapy done right.

In their latest picture-book collaboration, Black and Ohi (I’m Bored, 2012) serve up some good life lessons with the help of a quirky trio of friends: a child with a dress and pigtails; a talking flamingo, who is the titular sad character; and an anthropomorphic potato. As the flamingo expresses its sadness and the other characters, in their own ways, try to provide comfort, the text is delivered entirely in color-coded dialogue, and Ohi’s spare visual aesthetic matches the writing’s restraint. The stolid potato’s lines provide ample comic relief, while the human child exudes empathy. No reason is ever given for the flamingo’s sadness, and neither the child’s many ideas for cheering it up, nor the potato’s one idea (“Dirt!” and “Soil!”) help. The child assures the flamingo that it’s OK to be sad, but finally, a just-this-side-of-mean wisecrack from the potato gets everyone, including the flamingo, laughing. “I still feel a little bit sad, but I also feel a little bit better,” the flamingo says on the penultimate page, and here Ohi depicts the friends in silhouette, which provides a gently melancholy tone for the sweet conclusion.

Happy to see such a well-done feelings book. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: June 5, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4814-7627-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: April 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2018

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A pro-girl book with illustrations that far outshine the text. (Picture book. 3-7)

I AM ENOUGH

A feel-good book about self-acceptance.

Empire star Byers and Bobo offer a beautifully illustrated, rhyming picture book detailing what one brown-skinned little girl with an impressive Afro appreciates about herself. Relying on similes, the text establishes a pattern with the opening sentence, “Like the sun, I’m here to shine,” and follows it through most of the book. Some of them work well, while others fall flat: “Like the rain, I’m here to pour / and drip and fall until I’m full.” In some vignettes she’s by herself; and in others, pictured along with children of other races. While the book’s pro-diversity message comes through, the didactic and even prideful expressions of self-acceptance make the book exasperatingly preachy—a common pitfall for books by celebrity authors. In contrast, Bobo’s illustrations are visually stunning. After painting the children and the objects with which they interact, such as flowers, books, and a red wagon, in acrylic on board for a traditional look, she scanned the images into Adobe Photoshop and added the backgrounds digitally in chalk. This lends a whimsical feel to such details as a rainbow, a window, wind, and rain—all reminiscent of Harold and the Purple Crayon. Bobo creates an inclusive world of girls in which wearing glasses, using a wheelchair, wearing a head scarf, and having a big Afro are unconditionally accepted rather than markers for othering.

A pro-girl book with illustrations that far outshine the text. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: March 6, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-06-266712-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Dec. 3, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2018

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Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for...

OLIVER AND HIS EGG

Oliver, of first-day-of-school alligator fame, is back, imagining adventures and still struggling to find balance between introversion and extroversion.

“When Oliver found his egg…” on the playground, mint-green backgrounds signifying Oliver’s flight into fancy slowly grow larger until they take up entire spreads; Oliver’s creature, white and dinosaurlike with orange polka dots, grows larger with them. Their adventures include sharing treats, sailing the seas and going into outer space. A classmate’s yell brings him back to reality, where readers see him sitting on top of a rock. Even considering Schmid’s scribbly style, readers can almost see the wheels turning in his head as he ponders the girl and whether or not to give up his solitary play. “But when Oliver found his rock… // Oliver imagined many adventures // with all his friends!” This last is on a double gatefold that opens to show the children enjoying the creature’s slippery curves. A final wordless spread depicts all the children sitting on rocks, expressions gleeful, wondering, waiting, hopeful. The illustrations, done in pastel pencil and digital color, again make masterful use of white space and page turns, although this tale is not nearly as funny or tongue-in-cheek as Oliver and His Alligator (2013), nor is its message as clear and immediately accessible to children.

Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for all children but sadly isn’t. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4231-7573-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2014

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