LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD

My, what big talent she has! British artist Watts’s treatment of this Grimm Brothers favorite was first published in Europe in 1968. Now issued with a new (sadly uncredited) English translation, it will reach a contemporary American audience. The illustrator’s detailed, richly colored pictures bear the influence of her mentor, Brian Wildsmith, and she demonstrates her mastery of the picture-book form as she juxtaposes characters across the gutter at strategic moments, employs fully saturated pages at some turns and spot art at others, all heightening readers’ focus and dramatic tension at key points. That said, even the inclusion of the oft-excluded scene in which the huntsman sews stones into the belly of the doomed wolf doesn’t push the story into terribly frightening graphic content. Earlier, both Grandma and Little Red are devoured offstage in the illustrations, and the four-picture sequence depicting the wolf getting his comeuppance is comical rather than gory. The old is new again here, and this is a welcome addition to the fairy-tale shelf. (Picture book/fairy tale. 5-9)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-7358-2256-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: NorthSouth

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2009

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ABIYOYO RETURNS

The seemingly ageless Seeger brings back his renowned giant for another go in a tuneful tale that, like the art, is a bit sketchy, but chockful of worthy messages. Faced with yearly floods and droughts since they’ve cut down all their trees, the townsfolk decide to build a dam—but the project is stymied by a boulder that is too huge to move. Call on Abiyoyo, suggests the granddaughter of the man with the magic wand, then just “Zoop Zoop” him away again. But the rock that Abiyoyo obligingly flings aside smashes the wand. How to avoid Abiyoyo’s destruction now? Sing the monster to sleep, then make it a peaceful, tree-planting member of the community, of course. Seeger sums it up in a postscript: “every community must learn to manage its giants.” Hays, who illustrated the original (1986), creates colorful, if unfinished-looking, scenes featuring a notably multicultural human cast and a towering Cubist fantasy of a giant. The song, based on a Xhosa lullaby, still has that hard-to-resist sing-along potential, and the themes of waging peace, collective action, and the benefits of sound ecological practices are presented in ways that children will both appreciate and enjoy. (Picture book. 5-9)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-689-83271-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2001

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HELLO, HARVEST MOON

As atmospheric as its companion, Twilight Comes Twice, this tone poem pairs poetically intense writing with luminescent oils featuring widely spaced houses, open lawns, and clumps of autumnal trees, all lit by a huge full moon. Fletcher tracks that moon’s nocturnal path in language rich in metaphor: “With silent slippers / it climbs the night stairs,” “staining earth and sky with a ghostly glow,” lighting up a child’s bedroom, the wings of a small plane, moonflowers, and, ranging further afield, harbor waves and the shells of turtle hatchlings on a beach. Using creamy brushwork and subtly muted colors, Kiesler depicts each landscape, each night creature from Luna moths to a sleepless child and her cat, as well as the great moon sweeping across star-flecked skies, from varied but never vertiginous angles. Closing with moonset, as dawn illuminates the world with a different kind of light, this makes peaceful reading either in season, or on any moonlit night. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 22, 2003

ISBN: 0-618-16451-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Clarion Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2003

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